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Author Topic: The Right Tools for the Job: a Grooming Tools Reference Guide  (Read 28887 times)
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bluebell
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« Reply #45 on: October 30, 2007, 09:08:58 PM »

Barnaby gets himself in some right funny positions, but I would never put him in them myself - I'm too much of a worry-wart! Laughing

I understand flowers I just didn't want you (or non-members reading this thread) to think I would do anything to hurt a dog.

I meant to say in my post that it also makes a huge difference that you've been doing it for so long - I've only had Barnaby for a year and I've never had another before him so I'm not exactly a dab-hand at it yet blush

Laughing I remember when I first started. I used to treat them all like Waterford Crystal nodding Not that I' m not gentle now but I was SO afraid of hurting them that I was afraid to do anything!

I do have one question (although I'm sure it will sound ridiculous Bag Head )...I just brushed Barnaby out and realised that, although I do line brush, I do it from his left side to his right side rather than from head to tail (if you see what I mean unsure ).  Does it make any difference? confused  I don't imagine that it would, but I'm a curious being Laughing

As long as you have a pattern that is consistent it shouldn't matter from what direction you start. It is important to get into all of the nooks and crannies and the method is just a guide to get you in the practice of getting the comb through all of the coat thumbsup
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« Reply #46 on: December 05, 2007, 11:59:31 AM »

I saw this ad on TV and was curious about it so I checked out their website.
It's a contraption that clips the dogs nails with no chance of hurting them.
There's a little video too.
Let me know what you think, it's very interesting. Here's the link. (OMG! Thay so totally RHYMED)  Laugh Hysterical

PEDICURE.COM
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Suzy83
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« Reply #47 on: January 12, 2008, 06:48:24 PM »

If you keep the fluff very short, what kind of brush or comb do you need to brush it daily?
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lainey
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« Reply #48 on: January 12, 2008, 07:02:15 PM »

Hi Susy


Here is the first post on this thread which should help. As far as I know will still need a Pin & a Slicker brush, i am sure you will get more advice from a more experienced member soon.


Lets take a look at the tools.

The first tool in my kit is a slicker brush.  This is a brush with bent bristles and comes in a wide variety of firmness levels, shapes and sizes. A common complaint I have heard is that the dogs do not tolerate this brush, and that it irritates the skin. My guess as to why dogs do not always tolerate this brush is that it is a firm brush and is often used with too much pressure. Cheaper slicker brushes can also have very rough edges on the bristles. If it scratches your skin it can scratch theirs.

I use one of two brands of slicker brushes. The first is by Chris Christiansen (Click Here for Chris's website). These brushes have rounded tips to avoid hair breakage and skin irritation. They are also a finer grade of bristle, making for a soft brush. This brush is excellent for puppies (who have thinner coats), older fluffs whose coats are thinning, and fluffs who are kept in shorter trims. They can be used on longer coats if you employ the line brushing method (for detailed instructions on this brushing method, check this thread). This brush is not good for breaking up mats. It can handle a small tangle, but the fineness of the bristles will be ineffective against solid pieces of any size.

The second line of brushes is by Les Poochs (Click Here for Michel's webpage). These slicker brushes have flexible heads to reduce brushing pressure. They come in varying firmness levels, ranging from soft to very firm. In my experience, the softer bristles of these brushes do not hold up nearly as well as the Chris Christiansen. This is my opinion. I do regularly use the "blue" brushes and the Mat Zapper (red handle). These are excellent for mat work, as the stiffer bristles will break up the mats and the flexible heads will reduce the pressure on the skin. A cheaper version of these brushes has been introduced by Mars and Master Grooming Tools. I have used the latter and they are pretty decent (you can find them Here).

When using this type of brush, you do not want to apply too much pressure. Test it out on your forearm to see that you are not brushing too aggressively (on the same note, you must apply some pressure or else you will not get the bristles through the hair). When dealing with a mat,  I will first spritz the mat with a leave-in conditioner. I love Chris Christiansen's Ice on Ice, as well as Top Performance's GloCoat (click each brand name to go to their respective webpages).  After the mat has been moistened I will grasp in between my fingers and start brushing. I do not like to use mat breakers or other bladed tools as these cut the hair, creating holes in the coat. I will pick apart the mat using the brush and a comb, keeping my fingers between the mat and the skin. Obviously severe or cast matting (pelting/felting) cannot be tackled this way, but hopefully using the right tools the right way will prevent you from seeing those severe types of mats Happy 2

Lainey & Mitsy  flowers
« Last Edit: January 12, 2008, 07:13:33 PM by lainey » Logged

pam
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« Reply #49 on: April 03, 2008, 04:36:07 PM »

I shouldn't have read this thread Laugh Hysterical I now have decided that I need a new teflon comb (I have several combs but with those retractable teeth and they are metal).  And obviousl I need a new brush.  I have looked at the Chris Christiansen ones - and am trying to recover from the price!  Ah well - what is wrong with debt in the present economic climate!

Thanks Danielle
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bluebell
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« Reply #50 on: April 03, 2008, 06:49:49 PM »

Pam you can never have enough fancy things No Laughing I just got the new CherryBrook catalogue today (a dog show/retail supplier) and of course there are a bunch of new items to splurge on (particularly some new nylon leads!). Cereal for me again tonight! Laugh Hysterical
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« Reply #51 on: April 03, 2008, 07:54:59 PM »

The 3 prong item in Carol's post from Oct 28, 2007, (page 1, post #7) is used to clean off the pin brush.  It is not to be used on the dog!

Now I have something to add.

I have made an amazing discovery in clipping!  You see, about Feb 2007, I bought an electric clipper for my (at that time) one bichon.  Since then, I have used it on 1, 2 and then 4 dogs, on an almost biweekly basis.  The odd thing was, as much as I read and practiced, my skills never seemed to improve.   No   Rather frustrating.   Don't Get It

Then I had an idea:  yesterday, I put in NEW BLADES.   IT REALLY DOES MATTER.   Laugh and Bounce 

I actually DO know a bit about how to clip these lovely dogs.  WOW!  Yesterday I went zip zip zip over Marlin (my BIG BICHON) and almost got him done before he had enough.  I finished up today.  So keep in mind to check and replace your blades or get them sharpened.   Rolled Eyes


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« Reply #52 on: April 03, 2008, 08:49:03 PM »

The 3 prong item in Carol's post from Oct 28, 2007, (page 1, post #7) is used to clean off the pin brush.  It is not to be used on the dog!

  :laughing:I remember that thing. Trust me, it was never used on my Ozzie!   No Good to know what it is used for though.  Clap
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« Reply #53 on: September 21, 2008, 12:42:14 PM »

i would love the grey tool to scratch my back!!! And Daisy would run when she sees the first bruch because I push to hard ans shes a wous!
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« Reply #54 on: December 07, 2008, 11:53:46 AM »

Wow, I just got though this thread, EXCELLENT! Thank you, I just wish the videos had not been removed. Sad
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Thank you Alison!
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« Reply #55 on: April 20, 2013, 11:04:55 AM »

I was just looking through this thread and just as luck would have it, I seem to have come up with the right tools for the job. What I'd still like to know is, how many of you clip your dog yourself? Is it difficult? If you do, what clippers do you use? Do you have some sort of chain with a clip to connect to the collar like the groomer's tables have or do you find it easy enough to just hold your dog?

I once had a set of barber's clippers, basically an electric clipper with some combs you snapped on one end. Each comb had sort of a bumper that allowed you to only cut the hair down to a certain point. Having thrown it away some years ago, I don't have it to measure, but I'd say the deepest comb was about 3/4"... Certainly deep enough to clip my Hogan without him looking too shaved.

We currently take him to one of the local PetSmart stores. They do a nice job and the young people working there are very sweet. It's obvious Hogan likes them from the way he acts when we get there and they tell me he behaves very well when he is bathed and clipped. My only problem is that they often clip him somewhat shorter than I'd like.

Since I bathe him about once a week, I do know he actually seems to like playing in the water. I've brushed his teeth about every third day or so and he's OK for that. I just started thinking if he holds still for all I do, maybe he would let me clip him if I could learn how.

So, what do you folks do?

Thanks,
Dennis
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« Reply #56 on: April 20, 2013, 02:30:38 PM »

I think quite a lot of us home groom.I use a clippers with a comb like you describe for Abby's body and scissor her head and legs.It isn't hard,but some grooms are better than others and after all it soon grows and you learn as you go.Alison
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Lil Toby
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« Reply #57 on: April 07, 2014, 05:42:23 PM »

My Toby loves to be groomed, he is great for clipping nails too. He looks like the Lion King when he stands to be brushed everyday. I do all his grooming.
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Lil Toby and Elaine Welch
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« Reply #58 on: April 08, 2014, 06:48:30 PM »

I like the small Wahl clipper I just bring up his hair by comb and clip off as much as I want. I feel in better control than the bigger clipper plus it's quieter.
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Lil Toby and Elaine Welch
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« Reply #59 on: April 30, 2014, 11:29:41 AM »

Hi from Sweden! What kind of nail-clippers would you recommend, if any? Our Joysee hates getting nails clipped, and I wonder if there are clippers that these dogs don't mind?
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