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Author Topic: Hi! my name is Craig  (Read 7352 times)
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bKay, Bullett & Coco
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« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2015, 07:21:05 PM »

 Welcome Craig,
Happy to hear you are interested in rescue AND that you are doing research BEFORE getting a pup.  I think you'll find the curlier the bichon the more labor intensive their grooming will be.  When Bullett was younger (got him at age 3-4 yr) he had curly hair on legs,head and back but 6 yrs later it has thinned/become very fine and he is mostly wavy or straight.  I don't think he is full Bichon.  Easy to care for tho.  Coco has dense tight curly hair that takes forever to comb out each day so he is kept short. 

During their bath time they are trimmed around their privates, eyes & ears, brush their teeth, clean & pluck ears.  They both stand better in the sink than they do on a counter or table and the height suits my back better.  Mine get bathed every 1-2 weeks.  Bullett is a biter so I do him and thought $50 was too high after paying for Coco to go to the groomers so do him myself now too.  Guess $50 is cheap compared to what everyone else is paying.  Bath time takes about 30 - 45 mins each. Bullett will start snapping at fast movements so I move slowly around him and Coco was never groomed by his previous owner and gives me a look of indignation anytime I touch a comb to him or plop him down in the sink!  I try to make it more pleasant for him too.

Bullett was my only pup until I got Coco this past December.  He has never minded being home alone while I work (4 miles from home) but I do come home for the lunch hour.  He actually seems to be happy to use my time at work to rest up since he doesn't nap at all when I'm home.   Coco on the other hand lays by the door I leave from until I come back home. He sleeps most of his days away whether I'm home or not.   If you worked close to home & can give one a mid day break you might do ok with adopting now.  They really are wonderful little companions.  My job is extremely stressful dealing with escalated customers all day but the minute I walk through the door they make all that stress go away.   fluffhug
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southjerseycraig
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« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2015, 08:04:53 PM »

Thanks for all the info on your two. Stress relief -- yes, that is what a pet can bring despite all the work needed to keep the pet happy and healthy.

I think it's great that you can come home for lunch. My understanding is that bichons should be left alone for no more than four hours a time. (Maybe you can do a bit better because your two fluffes can keep each other company.) This is why I don't want to get a bichon until I am retired, or at least in a work situation where I need not be away for hours at a time.
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Freedom (Sandie)
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« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2015, 09:54:47 AM »

When the dog is under the dryer, you are not just standing there, counting ceiling tiles, lol.  You are brushing out the coat to straighten it.  The ONLY way the coat can be properly trimmed (using either electric clippers or scissors) is by having the hair straight.

Since you have been reading many posts on here, I imagine you have been to the Bichon Informtation Station; but I will provide the link here just in case.  The top is medical stuff just scroll down, there is a ton of info on there as well.  Including how to  house train.  Yes,, bichons can often take until 18 months to house train.

http://bichonfriseusa.com/
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southjerseycraig
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« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2015, 10:07:21 AM »

many thanks, Sandie. There seems to be a lot of variation among owners in how long it takes to house-train a bichon. Some claim to have done it in a few days! But my impression has been that for many owners it takes longer. Some say their bichons never became 100% house-trained.

Let me add two related questions about house-training:

1. It is my understanding that bichons are quite reluctant to go outside when it is raining or snowing. (This may be just as well considering that if the dob does go out, a bath is going to be necessary.) So I would imagine that an owner always has to have a place to put puppy pads. Correct?

2. I know of one breeder who trains puppies to use a dog litter box, and some say that an adult can be taught -- after some months -- to use a dog litter box. Has anybody successfully gone this route?

Thanks to everyone for their responses.
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susie l
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« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2015, 01:46:54 PM »

Sandie-- Thanks for the peanut butter tip.... going to try it this afternoon..

Craig ---My best advise to you is to go to the Philadelphia National dog show that starts Saturday November 14, 2015 and ends Sunday.  Its in Oaks Pa...Its just outside King of Prussia....   It is a benched show which means you can wander back there,  see the dogs close up and talk to reputable breeders and get alot of info.  Some of them do have pet quality as well as show and may occasionally have an older dog.  You'll need the schedule though because some of the dogs are judged Sat and some Sunday and some pretty early in the day....I don't know if they are required to stay after the judging.

As for how I got Olivia -I had called Estelle Kellerman at Windstar kennels on Long Island NY. and asked if she had an older dog.   My sister and I had gotten bichons from her before.  I really did'nt think I could go through puppyhood again although, I have lovely memories.  She didn't have any older dogs but she happened to know of another breeder that concentrated on a different breed that had Olivia----She had been returned because the people decided " they weren't dog people".  I got her at 2 yrs paper trained and missing an important socialization period...oh, and not a clue how to play---but the most incredibly loving dog I've ever had.

 My first bichon a female, was housebroken in a few days.   Olivia for the most part does her business outdoors, but I always keep a pad next to the litterbox (yes, I have 2 cats).   On the beginning I thought it might have been confusing for her but with the heavy snow we get I didn't want to completely break the puppypad habit---and yes Bichons don't like to get their feet wet..lol

I wouldn't assume most rescues are not going to be tolerant of grooming.  Bichons as well as Poodles are introduced very early to life at the groomer.   I think you have been referring to Delaware Valley Bichon rescue and I would think that they could get some Senior surrenders....Dogs that were well taken care of and greatly loved till things went South.... 
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southjerseycraig
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« Reply #20 on: October 31, 2015, 05:26:27 PM »

Susie, thanks for all of that information. Yes, Bichon Valley Rescue has dogs of a variety of ages, and usually the surrender wasn't caused by the dog's behavior. (At least that's what they say; usually the reason is that the owner can no longer take care of the fluff.)  I'm glad to hear you've had good house-training experiences. It sounds like a great idea to keep pads around for the wet days.
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Freedom (Sandie)
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« Reply #21 on: November 01, 2015, 10:26:13 AM »

Let me add two related questions about house-training:

1. It is my understanding that bichons are quite reluctant to go outside when it is raining or snowing. (This may be just as well considering that if the dob does go out, a bath is going to be necessary.) So I would imagine that an owner always has to have a place to put puppy pads. Correct?

2. I know of one breeder who trains puppies to use a dog litter box, and some say that an adult can be taught -- after some months -- to use a dog litter box. Has anybody successfully gone this route?

Thanks to everyone for their responses.

Going out in bad weather does not mean a bath is required; just dry their feet, perhaps.  I don't use pee pads.  I herd them out.  Sure they run out, pee and run back in, but at least they go OUTSIDE he heee.  YOU have to be the pack leader.  Firm, positive reinforcement (a treat ready on the return inside).  Bichons are VERY good at manipulation, be sure YOU are strong enough to handle one!  I don't mean physically.  I mean, you have to be the pack leader, and not leave a vacuum for them to fill.  A good book to read on this topic:  The Other End of the Leash by Patricia McConnell.  You can
find it at the library.

Also, since my boys are in belly bands indoors, a pee pad would not serve any purpose for them.

Never used a litter box.

Susie, doesn't your dog go in the cat litter box and eat the "tootsie rolls?"  Dogs should never have access to either cat food or cat litter boxes.

Sandie-- Thanks for the peanut butter tip.... going to try it this afternoon..
. . . .
I wouldn't assume most rescues are not going to be tolerant of grooming.  Bichons as well as Poodles are introduced very early to life at the groomer.   I think you have been referring to Delaware Valley Bichon rescue and I would think that they could get some Senior surrenders....Dogs that were well taken care of and greatly loved till things went South.... 


I hope the peanut butter helped some!

Correct,  not all rescues hate grooming.  It depends on the dog's background.  My RB Marlin was age 8 when he came to me.  His first owner took him to the groomer twice a year.  Needless to say, he was totally matted and had to be shaved down.  He HATED grooming, would holler and scream until he was hoarse, try to jump off the table.   My RB Sugar was a retired gal from a responsible groomer.  She loved the massage experience.  My current gal Tasha is a puppy mill rescue, born and raised in a cage in Missouri, used to produce puppies for pet stores.  She was rescued at age 4 years 10 months.  So that is when she had her first ever grooming session.  Treats have helped me get her used to it; I also have to give her a calming remedy prior to any grooming. 

And it makes sense that most of the mature dogs in rescue, the owner could no longer provide care.  Being companion dogs, many are owned by the elderly.  Once the person moves to a nursing home, or assisted living, or dies, then if no one in the family wants the dog, it ends up in rescue.  Often the family has no idea what a lovely breed this dog can be, they just see the mess it has become, and they have to deal with the human family member; so taking on a dog as well is just too much.
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southjerseycraig
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« Reply #22 on: November 01, 2015, 11:39:04 AM »

Sandie, thank you for your very sensible advice. The issue of being "strong enough" is one on my mind because I have never lived with a dog. I have one of Patricia McConnell's books, and intend to read the one you mention. She sounds very competent and I trust her much more than what I read on the internet.
But I do think I need to spend more time with dogs of all ages and breeds.

Every bichon has his or her own personality and background, and so I'm not surprised that reactions to grooming vary.
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susie l
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« Reply #23 on: November 01, 2015, 06:52:43 PM »

Sandie---I think I need that Groomers helper that you suggested on another thread.  I put the peanut butter on the arm, but when she's anxious she has no interest in treats....And she was twirling and backing up almost into the peanut butter   (I should have put the peanut butter higher on the arm)..... I took her down, gave us both a break (I had a peanut butter and jelly sandwich...lol) and let the remainder of her head dry naturally.

Yes you are right about the cat cookies....I had that problem at my sister's house when I had first gotten her.  At my sister's house I keep her out of the litter box area, but, she's scared of my covered litter box and has never attempted to go in.
     
Mind you, cat vomit is a more difficult issue for me and seems to be quite a delicacy for her  vomit....lol

More than you ever wanted to know.....right Craig? sick crazy

No problem keeping Olivia out of the cat food......----Cats eat on a table.
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southjerseycraig
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« Reply #24 on: November 01, 2015, 07:30:29 PM »

Susie, these are exactly the kind of things I do want to know. The tootsie roll problem must be especially difficult if the cat won't use a covered litter box.
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Freedom (Sandie)
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« Reply #25 on: November 02, 2015, 04:45:42 PM »

Oh goodness, just what you needed, a clean doggie backing into peanut butter!

I imagine you have tried Rescue Remedy and Composure chews to help calm her.

Susie, these are exactly the kind of things I do want to know. The tootsie roll problem must be especially difficult if the cat won't use a covered litter box.

Not a problem; I have baby gates across the rooms with cat food / litter boxes in them.  I step over the gates, the cats jump in and out, the dogs have no access.

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southjerseycraig
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« Reply #26 on: November 02, 2015, 07:21:07 PM »

So I take it that bichons are *not* high-jump champions!
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Freedom (Sandie)
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« Reply #27 on: November 03, 2015, 05:06:57 PM »

So I take it that bichons are *not* high-jump champions!

Ha ha haa, no they are not.  Think "brick on block" build for these dogs.  The closer the dog is to the 'standard,' the more that brick is square.  Most of mine are true brick shaped - long blocky bodies on short legs.  For Agility, most do an 8 inch jump.  A few are in the 12 inch.   



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southjerseycraig
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« Reply #28 on: November 03, 2015, 06:23:08 PM »

I know that with poodles "square" is the standard; I didn't realize that bichons are supposed to come as close as possible. (It's hard for me to imagine a square bichon!) Obviously one does not want too long a body -- I would think that would cause back troubles -- but square is a little bit much to ask.
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Freedom (Sandie)
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« Reply #29 on: November 04, 2015, 09:26:03 AM »

Can't find it at the moment; but somewhere, there is a chart with the AKC standard.  The height from floor to top of shoulders is 9 to 11 inches.  The length is not more than 1.5 times that.  So at a 9 inch height, the length along the back, base of neck to base of tail, should not be more than 13.5 inches.  Pretty close to square.  Boxy for sure.
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