Another Nutritionist's OPINION ABOUT VITAMIN K3

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EDDEL:

EDDEL:
Before I post the response from the kibble-company's nutritionist, let me say loud & clear, this is NOT :noway: A PERSONAL ATTACK on Diane & her article.  xx-member & I are also NOT :noway: LOOKING TO PROMOTE AN ARGUMENT with Diane.  We appreciate the information/article :see: that Diane has posted.

Like Diane's article, this information :see: is posted for the benefit of our members.  It's not that xx-member or I want to dictate what our members should or should not do.  The decision :thinking: is theirs to make.  And as with most decisions , it should be an informed one :graduate: (and that can only happen when one has as much information as possible).


Hence the posting of this other nutritionist's opinion about K3:-
Quote from: Dr. Summers, Nutritionist

Dear xx

Thanks you for your inquiry. Let me begin by saying that I am delighted that your Bichon is thriving on the ___________ dry kibble.

Menadione sodium bisulfate complex is a source of Vitamin K. There have been statements made that Vitamin K is harmful to dogs, and this may be a reason you have heard concerns about the use of Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex. I have had previous inquires about the safety of menadione sodium bisulfite complex and have replied with the following; "There is "inter-net" information telling dog owners that menadione, which is another name for Vitamin K, is not safe for dogs. I have done a thorough search for scientific information on the effect of menadione on dogs and to date, have not found any scientific information that suggests menadione is unsafe for dogs at the levels used in dog foods.

I am also not aware of any other research that suggests menadione is toxic to other animals. My background and training is in science and therefore, I choose to believe the science.  I have responded in the same manner to all the menadione inquires that I have received and have requested any of the scientific information that the "sender" has in his/her possession. To date I have never received any information."

If you have questions, please contact me.

Sincerely,
Dr. X.X. Summers
Nutritionist, xx Inc.




Quote from: xx-member

I appreciate your response. I have attached an article on Vitamin K3 that I would appreciate your passing by your Nutritionist, Dr. Summers. If she could let me know what she thinks of it, I would be very appreciative. I am very concerned with these conflicting opinions.




Quote from: Dr.Summers, Nutritionist

Dear xx
 
At least this latest article on the negative effects of Vitamin K is complete with some references; the supposed sources of the information. I believe the last reference quoted was the initial article written about the negative effects of Vitamin K on dogs. I have read a translation of the initial article, and it sadly did not include valid references, nor did the author connect the dots in the statements being made about Vitamin K.

In the attached article, there are similar statements about Vitamin K which bounce between true statements and misleading or false statements. I admit that I could be more knowledgeable about Vitamin K, but I don't think that would help me understand the attached article.

I have not read the references quoted in the article, and typically it would take hours and hours to try and locate them. The last two are most likely in German which I am unable to read. Ideally, I would like to take each statement in the article, look at the references and see if the information supported the statements. For example, in the 4th paragraph the article said that, " K3 is proven to be ineffective for blood clotting." K3 is not the most active form of Vitamin K as the body has to convert it into the more active form of Vitamin K. K3 is therefore less effective for blood clotting, but it is not ineffective. Why not use the active form of Vitamin K in pet food? The more active the form, the greater the chance of toxicity. That is a primary reason why K1 form is not used in pet food or human supplements.

I find the article offensive because it is preys on people's concern for their pets while counting on their lack of knowledge to understand which statements are true and which ones are false. I even have trouble sorting the truth from the fiction. I admit I have some assumptions about Vitamin K, ( K3 in particular) which may be wrong and p[possibly should be updated. Unfortunately, this article does nothing to help me understand whether or not Vitamin K could possibly have some negative effects and ultimately leaves you to have to draw your own conclusions.
 
Sincerely,
Dr. X.X. Summers
Nutritionist, xx Inc.




Quote from: xx-member

Please accept my appreciation for your response.  If you discover anything further regarding K3 and it's side effects, I would be very interested.

Annie36:
Thank you Del and member xx for deciding to post this for us all. I appreciate it immensely :bouquet:

Princess Lucy Loulou:
Me too Del and member xx,  :nodding: now weve got all the info we can make up our own minds  :thumbup:

uslimey:
Thank goodness I don't have to make up my mind as Charley is on raw food, but then there are debates about that too :wink: :chef: :hungry:

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