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Author Topic: Home Made Diets For Bladder Stones  (Read 10032 times)
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bluebell
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« on: October 08, 2009, 07:25:50 PM »

As we all know, we recently learned that Bluebell has crystals in her urine, which can lead to the development of stones.

I'm not looking to start debate or try to discredit what other people's vets have told them, but I will not feed my animals food that contain the type of ingredients that are found in the commercial Rx diets. My vet was happy to work with me on this, and even supplied me with some information about home cooking for Bluebell. In addition to her info, I have been gathering info and opinions from the web concerning raw diets and bladder stones.

I AM NOT A VET, NOR AM I A NUTRITIONIST. DO NOT FOLLOW ANY OF THIS INFORMATION WITHOUT DOING YOUR OWN RESEARCH FIRST AND DISCUSSING WITH YOUR OWN VET.

For All Dogs at Risk of Stones

Keep fresh, distilled water available for your dog at all times, and encourage consumption of water. I might make a homemade chicken stock and add that to the water to keep the dog drinking nicely. Keeping the kidneys and bladders flushed is of paramount importance to help prevent crystals and stone formation. Water consumption is very, very important!


Giving a B vitamin supplement may be helpful and has been indicated in use for humans with these problems. http://www.doctoryourself.com/kidney.html

Raw Food Diets

Monica Segal has a raw diet for each TYPE of stones (which is super important) in her book, Optimum Nutrition. She also will customize the diets, for a nominal fee. She can be found at www.monicasegal.com.

Sabine Contreras also does customized, raw diets, for dogs with issues. She can be found at www.betterdogcare.com.

If your dog has struvite bladder stones, then acidifying the diet, along with treating the infection, can help dissolve the stones. Ascorbic acid (a form of vitamin C), and distilled water can help with this. , Acidic foods include chicken, beef, eggs, fish, pork, cottage cheese, yogurt, rice (brown and white), beans, nuts and all seafood. See http://www.herbtime.com/InformationPages/FoodsforAlkalineAcid.htm for more information on acidifying and alkalizing foods. See http://www.marvistavet.com/html/canine_struvite_bladder_stones.html for more information on struvite bladder stones.

Some people have had success keeping the urine acidic, which helps prevent these crystals from forming, by feeding acidic foods and avoiding alkaline foods. A raw, natural diet is high in acidic foods. Because bladder infections lead to high alkaline urinary pH and struvite crystals, many people, including many vets, make the mistake of treating the problem by acidifying the diet. But that is confusing cause and effect. Alkaline pH and struvite crystals are not caused by a diet of alkaline foods; they are usually caused by bladder infections. Therefore, trying to make the urine more acidic will not get rid of the infection. Alkaline pH can also be normal, as pH can vary a great deal even in the same dog at different times of the day, and also by the way the urine was captured and handled before testing.

Calcium Oxalate crystals can also be found in a healthy dog, but are more prone to develop into stones in some dogs. The pH in dogs with these types of crystals is usually acidic or neutral. It is thought that some dogs that are more prone to these types of stones have an inherited weakness that prevents them from forming nephrocalein, which prevents calcium oxalate stone formation. While these stones are mostly treated by surgically removing them, there has been some success with reducing the oxalate rich foods in the diet and working to alkalize the urine pH.

Alkalizing foods include apples, bananas, cabbage, broccoli, beans, potatoes, pumpkin, millet, honey, alfalfa, non-distilled vinegar (organic apple cider vinegar), squash and most fruit and most vegetables.
High oxalate foods to avoid include beet greens, rhubarb, spinach, beets, raw endive, dandelion greens, okra, kale and sweet potatoes. http://www.marinurology.com/articles/calculi/foods/oxalate.htm




Home Cooked Diets

This is what my vet gave me. I just typed it up.

Cottage Cheese and Rice (Struvite)

2/3 cup cottage cheese, 2% fat

1 large egg, hard boiled

2 cups brown rice, long grain, cooked

2 teaspoons vegetable (canola) oil

1/2 ounce brewer's yeast

4 bonemeal tablets (10-grain or equivalent)

1/4 teaspoon salt substitute (potassium chloride

1 multi-vitmain tablet (my vet recommended Pet-tabs)
 
Provides 780 kilocalories, 42.9 grams protein, 22 grams fat
Supports caloric needs of a 25-26 lb dog
Provides 92 milligrams sodium/100-kilocalorie diet - a high sodium intake.


Beef and Rice (Struvite)

1/4 pound very lean beef (raw weight), cooked

1 large egg, hard boiled

2 cups brown rice, long grain, cooked

1/2 ounce brwer's yeast

4 bonemeal tablets (10-grain or equivalent)

1/4 teaspoon salt substitute (potassium chloride

1 multi-vitmain tablet (my vet recommended Pet-tabs)

Provides 730 kilocalories, 40.7 grams protein, 19.7 grams fat
Supports caloric needs of a 24 lb dog
Provides 21.8 milligrams sodium/100-kilocalorie diet - a low sodium intake.


Tuna and Rice (Struvite)

4 ounces tuna, canned in water, no salt added

2 teaspoons vegetable (canola) oil

1 large egg, hard boiled

2 cups brown rice, long grain, cooked

1/2 ounce brwer's yeast

4 bonemeal tablets (10-grain or equivalent)

1/4 teaspoon salt substitute (potassium chloride

1 multi-vitmain tablet (my vet recommended Pet-tabs)

Provides 760 kilocalories, 47.3 grams protein, 21.1 grams fat
Supports caloric needs of a 31 lb dog
Provides 92.7 milligrams sodium/100-kilocalorie diet- a high sodium intake. Without the vegetable oil, the caloric content is 670 kilocalories and fat content is 24 grams. The oil can be omitted from the diet if the plan is to reduce the fat intake.


« Last Edit: October 13, 2009, 09:18:13 PM by Bluebell » Logged
SuperMax (Susan)
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« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2009, 07:57:24 PM »

Wow, you certainly have done quite a bit of research already, Danielle!  thumbsup

I think it's great to have many options to see what fits best into you and your fluffs lifestyle nodding .. if you have the time, ability, skills, to cook/prepare  chef a specialized diet for your fluff in need.. I say, more power to you!  rock

I will be interested to hear what more you find out. blush
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Lin
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2009, 10:24:15 PM »

Wow I'm impressed, thanks for sharing this information.  thumbup  I do hope Bluebell recovers nicely from her ordeal.
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Thank you Alison!
Princess Lucy Loulou
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« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2009, 08:29:19 AM »

Well done Danielle,   thumbup I admire you for knowing your own mind and wanting to do it your way  thumbsup
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« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2009, 01:14:52 AM »

Thank You Danielle thumbup for sharing what you've learnt/found graduate and composing this informative thread see.  I will add your thread (and Jane's "foods high in oxalates" thread) to the Food-Related Threads 'master list'.

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shrimpey (Alaina)
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« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2009, 01:48:52 AM »

Thanks Danielle for this great list although Jemma doesn't have crystals at this point in time I think this post will help those of us who may be dealing with this in the future  nodding I too send lots of get well wishes to Bluebell  thumbup
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Thank You Alison for our lovely new siggy Smiley
bluebell
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« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2009, 05:52:31 PM »

They dropped the recipes (3 for struvite stones) in the mail on Friday morning, so I should hopefully have them Tuesday to add and share. Hopefully it will be a good base for others to work off of if they find themselves in a similar situation.
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Annie36
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« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2009, 08:53:51 PM »

I can't wait to read them.
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bluebell
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« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2009, 09:18:45 PM »

Recipes are now in top post.
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« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2009, 06:44:46 PM »

Thanks Danielle......I have a question....where can you find Bonemeal tabs? I know of the kind of bonemeal we put on gardens, but I can't find where it explains if there is a difference.....Is there?
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bluebell
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« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2009, 06:50:45 PM »

I don;t know if there is a difference or not (I imagine there might be), but a quick Google search found me these:

http://www.vetvax.com/vitaminsdogs.html

I'm using what the vet gave me, though I'm contacting one of the nutritionists to tailor a better diet for her needs. I don't mind feeding this to expedite getting her numbers down, but I don't want to feed this for the rest of her life. I'd rather some raw (probably just a matter of adjusting her bone/mineral intake slightly).
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